[cs_content][cs_element_section _id=”1″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”2″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”3″ ][cs_element_image _id=”4″ ][cs_element_headline _id=”5″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][cs_element_layout_column _id=”6″ ][cs_element_text _id=”7″ ][cs_element_image _id=”8″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”9″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”10″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”11″ ][cs_element_headline _id=”12″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”13″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”14″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”15″ ][cs_element_headline _id=”16″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”17″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”18″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”19″ ][cs_element_image _id=”20″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”21″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”22″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”23″ ][cs_element_headline _id=”24″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”25″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”26″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”27″ ][cs_element_image _id=”28″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”29″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”30″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”31″ ][cs_element_headline _id=”32″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”33″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”34″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”35″ ][cs_element_image _id=”36″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”37″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”38″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”39″ ][cs_element_headline _id=”40″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”41″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”42″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”43″ ][x_feature_box title=”NO SEAT BELT POSES GREATEST RISK FOR TEENS” title_color=”” text_color=”” graphic=”image” graphic_size=”30px” graphic_shape=”square” graphic_color=”#ffffff” graphic_bg_color=”#2ecc71″ align_h=”left” align_v=”top” side_graphic_spacing=”10px” max_width=”none” graphic_image=”http://teendrivethrive.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/1.jpg” graphic_image_alt_text=””]In 2018, The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety study showed approximately 44% of teen drivers who died in crashes were not wearing their seat belts and 52% of teen passengers who died in crashes were not wearing seat belts.[/x_feature_box][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”45″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”46″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”47″ ][cs_element_button _id=”48″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”49″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”50″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”51″ ][x_feature_box title=”SPEEDING IS THE MOST FREQUENT RECKLESS TEEN BEHAVIOR” title_color=”” text_color=”” graphic=”image” graphic_size=”30px” graphic_shape=”square” graphic_color=”#ffffff” graphic_bg_color=”#2ecc71″ align_h=”left” align_v=”top” side_graphic_spacing=”10px” max_width=”none” graphic_image=”http://teendrivethrive.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/2.jpg” graphic_image_alt_text=””]The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates 39% of male teen drivers and 24% of female teen drivers fatal car accidents are caused by speeding. [/x_feature_box][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”53″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”54″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”55″ ][cs_element_button _id=”56″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”57″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”58″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”59″ ][x_feature_box title=”NIGHTTIME DRIVING REQUIRES EXPERIENCE” title_color=”” text_color=”” graphic=”image” graphic_size=”30px” graphic_shape=”square” graphic_color=”#ffffff” graphic_bg_color=”#2ecc71″ align_h=”left” align_v=”top” side_graphic_spacing=”10px” max_width=”none” graphic_image=”http://teendrivethrive.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/3.jpg” graphic_image_alt_text=””]Per mile driven, the fatal crash rate of 16-19 year-olds is about 4 times as high at night as it is during the day. Based on the 2017 National Household Travel Survey, teenagers’ rate of fatal nighttime crash involvements is about 3 times as high as the rate for adults age 30-59.[/x_feature_box][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”61″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”62″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”63″ ][cs_element_button _id=”64″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”65″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”66″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”67″ ][x_feature_box title=”BIGGER AND NEWER VEHICLES PROTECT BETTER” title_color=”” text_color=”” graphic=”image” graphic_size=”30px” graphic_shape=”square” graphic_color=”#ffffff” graphic_bg_color=”#2ecc71″ align_h=”left” align_v=”top” side_graphic_spacing=”10px” max_width=”none” graphic_image=”http://teendrivethrive.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/4.jpg” graphic_image_alt_text=””]The majority of teens in America killed in crashes were driving old cars ill-equipped to protect them, according to a study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Since statistics show teens are three times more likely to die in a car crash than adults over 20, it is especially important that they drive vehicles with the best crash protection and the most effective safety features, and larger vehicles which provide more protection than smaller vehicles.[/x_feature_box][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”69″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”70″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”71″ ][cs_element_button _id=”72″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][cs_element_section _id=”73″ ][cs_element_layout_row _id=”74″ ][cs_element_layout_column _id=”75″ ][cs_element_headline _id=”76″ ][cs_element_image _id=”77″ ][cs_element_headline _id=”78″ ][cs_element_headline _id=”79″ ][cs_element_text _id=”80″ ][/cs_element_layout_column][/cs_element_layout_row][/cs_element_section][/cs_content][cs_content_seo]TEEN CAR ACCIDENT DETAILS

January 1, 2020, 1:20am (Wednesday), clear, no rain, 44°F, Alamance County, NC – According to the Alamance County Sheriff’s Office and the North Carolina Highway Patrol, a teenager was killed in Alamance County in the early morning hours of New Year’s Day. Highway Patrol officers made their way to Snow Camp just before 1:20 a.m. the morning of January 1 to investigate a single-car accident near Snow Camp Road and Clark Road, adjacent to a nearby solar facility, Snow Camp Solar. Authorities confirm that a 16-year-old male, Leonardo Jubar Escalera, was killed when his vehicle veered violently to the right off Snow Camp Road and struck a stop sign, power pole, and a tree. The Highway Patrol indicated that speed was a factor in the accident, and that Escalera was not wearing a seat belt at the time of impact. There were no other vehicles involved in the accident, and Escalera was the lone individual in the car.

TEEN DRIVER RISK ANALYSIS

DRIVER BEHAVIORAL RISKS

INEXPERIENCE RISKS

VEHICLE SAFETY

LESSONS LEARNED

NO SEAT BELT POSES GREATEST RISK FOR TEENSIn 2018, The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety study showed approximately 44% of teen drivers who died in crashes were not wearing their seat belts and 52% of teen passengers who died in crashes were not wearing seat belts.

Learn More – Not Wearing Seat Belts

SPEEDING IS THE MOST FREQUENT RECKLESS TEEN BEHAVIORThe National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates 39% of male teen drivers and 24% of female teen drivers fatal car accidents are caused by speeding.

Learn More – Reckless Driving (Speeding)

NIGHTTIME DRIVING REQUIRES EXPERIENCEPer mile driven, the fatal crash rate of 16-19 year-olds is about 4 times as high at night as it is during the day. Based on the 2017 National Household Travel Survey, teenagers’ rate of fatal nighttime crash involvements is about 3 times as high as the rate for adults age 30-59.

Learn More – Nighttime Driving

BIGGER AND NEWER VEHICLES PROTECT BETTERThe majority of teens in America killed in crashes were driving old cars ill-equipped to protect them, according to a study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Since statistics show teens are three times more likely to die in a car crash than adults over 20, it is especially important that they drive vehicles with the best crash protection and the most effective safety features, and larger vehicles which provide more protection than smaller vehicles.

Learn More – Safe Cars for Teens

OBITUARY

Leonardo Jubar Escalera Velarde

August 23, 2003 – January 1, 2020

Graham Leonardo Jubar Escalera Velarde, 16 de Graham falleció inesperadamente el miércoles 1 de enero de 2020.
Leonardo nació el 23 de agosto de 2003 en Guanajuato, México, hijo de Luis Leonardo Escalera y Luzmaria Velarde. Él era un estudiante en Graham High School y trabajó como enmarcador en la industria de la construcción.
Sobreviviendo, además de su madre y su padre, están sus abuelos, Julio Velarde y su abuela Esperanza Tierrafria; su padrastro Martin Duran; una hermana Dania López; su tío Julio Velarde y su tía Ortencia Carbajal; primos Julio Velarde, Jr. y Ariela Carbajal, así como su novia Emily Ramírez.
Una celebración de la vida de Leonardo se llevará a cabo el lunes de 7 a 9 p. M. En el Servicio Funerario Omega y la capilla crematoria con un servicio de rosario a partir de las 8 p. M. Por el Padre Vincent Rubino, OFM Conv. Firme un libro de registro en línea en www.omegafsc.com. Los arreglos están a cargo del Servicio Funerario y Crematorio Omega.
(English Translation)
Leonardo Jubar Escalera Velarde, 16 of Graham passed away unexpectedly on Wednesday January 1, 2020. 
Leonardo was born in August 23, 2003 in Guanajuato, Mexico the son of Luis Leonardo Escalera and Luzmaria Velarde. He was a student at Graham High School and worked as a framer in the construction industry. 
Surviving in addition to his mother and father are his grand parents, Julio Velarde and his grand mother Esperanza Tierrafria; his stepfather Martin Duran; a sister Dania Lopez; his uncle Julio Velarde and aunt Ortencia Carbajal; cousins Julio Velarde, Jr. and Ariela Carbajal as well as his girlfriend Emily Ramirez.
A Celebration of Leonardo’s life will be held on Monday from 7-9 pm at Omega Funeral Service & Crematory Chapel with a Rosary Service beginning at 8 pm by  Father Vincent Rubino, OFM Conv. Sign an online register book at www.omegafsc.com. Arrangements are in the care of Omega Funeral Service & Crematory. 
To send flowers to the family or plant a tree in memory of Leonardo Jubar Escalera Velarde, please visit our floral store.ImageImageImageImageImageImage[/cs_content_seo]